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Sulfate-Feeding Microbes Active in Earth’s Oceans 2.7 Billion Years Ago

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December 30, 2012 in Science

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Scientists probing sulfide ore deposits from one of the world’s richest base-metal mines confirmed that oxygen levels were extremely low on Earth 2.7 billion years ago, but also shows that microbes were actively feeding on sulfate in the ocean and influencing seawater chemistry during that geological time period. The research, reported by a team of Canadian and U.S. scientists in Nature Geoscience, provides new insight into how ancient metal-ore deposits can be used to better understand the chemistry of the ancient oceans – and the early evolution of life.
Sulfate is the second most abundant dissolved ion in the oceans today. It comes from the “rusting” of rocks by atmospheric oxygen, which creates sulfate through chemical reactions with pyrite, the iron sulfide material known as “fool’s gold.”

The researchers, led by PhD student John Jamieson of the University of Ottawa and Prof. Boswell Wing of McGill, measured the “weight” of sulfur in samples of massive sulfide ore from the Kidd Creek copper-zinc mine in Timmins, Ontario, using a highly sensitive instrument known as a mass spectrometer.

The weight is determined by the different amounts of isotopes of sulfur in a sample, and the abundance of different isotopes indicates how much seawater sulfate was incorporated into the massive sulfide ore that formed at the bottom of ancient oceans. That ancient ore is now found on the Earth’s surface, and is particularly common in the Canadian shield.

The scientists found that much less sulfate was incorporated into the 2.7 billion-year-old ore at Kidd Creek than is incorporated into similar ore forming at the bottom of oceans today. From these measurements, the researchers were able to model how much sulfate must have been present in the ancient seawater. Their conclusion: sulfate levels were about 350 times lower than in today’s ocean. Though they were extremely low, sulfate levels in the ancient ocean still supported an active global population of microbes that use sulfate to gain energy from organic carbon.

“The sulfide ore deposits that we looked at are widespread on Earth, with Canada and Quebec holding the majority of them,” says Wing, an associate professor in McGill’s Department of Earth and Planetary Science. “We now have a tool for probing when and where these microbes actually came into global prominence.”

“Deep within a copper-zinc mine in northern Ontario that was once a volcanically active ancient seafloor may not be the most intuitive place one would think to look for clues into the conditions in which the earliest microbes thrived over 2.7 billion years ago,” Jamieson adds. “However, our increasing understanding of these ancient environments and our abilities to analyze samples to a very high precision has opened the door to further our understanding of the conditions under which life evolved.”

Image to the right shows one of the sulfide ore samples analyzed for the study. The bright area in the lower left, a “sulfide nodule,” preserves isotopic evidence of the presence of microbes that fed on sulfate in the ancient ocean.

For more information:nature.com
Journal reference:Nature Geoscience
Read more at:dailygalaxy.com

“Spectra from the NIMS instrument show highly distorted water bands in the dark regions, indicative of one or more hydrated minerals (Fig. 19). These deposits have been interpreted to indicate presence of hydrated salt minerals, sulfates, and possibly carbonates.”[Europa]
Source: Encyclopedia Of The Solar System Second Edition (Pg. 443)

“A Sulfate-rich Model of Titan’s Interior”
Source: http://adsabs.harvard.edu

“It was also surprising to find clays in geologically younger terrain than the sulfates,” said Dobrea. Current theories of Martian geological history suggest that clays, a product of aqueous alteration, actually formed early on when the planet’s waters were more alkaline. As the water acidified due to volcanism, the dominant alteration mineralogy became sulfates. “This forces us to rethink our current hypotheses of the history of water on Mars”
Source: Georgia Institute of Technology

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1 response to Sulfate-Feeding Microbes Active in Earth’s Oceans 2.7 Billion Years Ago

  1. interesting article, just one more nail in the coffin of young earth creationists like that fool ken ham

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