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Graphene Can Create “Hot Carrier” Cells for Photovoltaics?

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February 27, 2013 in Science

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Graphene’s potential applications in photovoltaics (PVs) have remained fairly limited. Nanomaterials of nearly every stripe, including quantum dots, nanowires and carbon nanotubes, have offered alternatives in the solar collecting cells of PVs. But research has really only offered graphene as a replacement to indium-tin-oxide (ITO)used in the electrodes for organic solar cells.

Now researchers at the Barcelona, Spain-based Institute of Photonic Science (ICFO), in collaboration with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research in Germany and Graphenea S.L. Donostia-in San Sebastian, Spain have taken some initial steps in using graphene in the conversion and the conduction layers of a PV cell.

The research, which was published in the journal Nature Physics (“Photoexcitation cascade and multiple hot-carrier generation in graphene”), has demonstrated that graphene is capable of converting one photon into multiple electrons, leading to electric current.

Until now, researchers had been looking at quantum dots to generate electron multiplication or creating so-called “hot carrier” cells in PVs.  While this line of research has gained some skeptics, it has been pursued for nearly a decade. The international team in this latest research has demonstrated that graphene can be used to create these hot carrier cells.


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