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Fossilized *Titan Raindrops

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December 7, 2012 in Outdoors

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The imprints of raindrops preserved in 2.7bn-year-old rock are being used to figure out what the atmosphere was like on the early Earth.

Scientists have used the depressions drops left to calculate how fast they were going as they impacted the ground.

This has allowed them to determine the density of air in ancient times.

This “palaeobarometry” approach, revealed at the AGU Fall Meeting, will help constrain the models that try to simulate conditions in Archaean times.

Earth 2.7 billion years ago was very different from the planet we know today.

It spun much faster, the Moon was closer and the Sun was much weaker. And there were no animals or plants in existence back then; the air was simply not breathable.

“There was probably quite a bit of nitrogen in the atmosphere, like today, but there was no oxygen,” explained Sanjoy Som from Nasa’s Ames Research Center.

“The oxygen was likely replaced by greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and methane.

Read more@http://www.bbc.co.uk

“It spun much faster, the Moon was closer and the Sun was much weaker. And there were no animals or plants in existence back then; the air was simply not breathable.”

Or spun about 16x slower, once was a “moon” and much father away from the Sun…

“There was probably quite a bit of nitrogen in the atmosphere, like today, but there was no oxygen,” explained Sanjoy Som from Nasa’s Ames Research Center.
“The oxygen was likely replaced by greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and methane.”

“Similarly to Earth, Titan’s atmosphere is mostly nitrogen but there is also methane and many other organic compounds.” European Space Agency

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Titan is Proto-Earth #5
Click Here to Learn the Deeper Truth About Our Solar System: 21st Century Original Planet Infowars Discovery

PASADENA, Calif. — As spring continues to unfold at Saturn, April showers on the planet’s largest moon, Titan, have brought methane rain to its equatorial deserts, as revealed in images captured by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft. This is the first time scientists have obtained current evidence of rain soaking Titan’s surface at low latitudes. Extensive rain from large cloud systems, spotted by Cassini’s cameras in late 2010, has apparently darkened the surface of the moon. The best explanation is these areas remained wet after methane rainstorms.
NASA.gov

2.7 billion years ago = Callisto/Titan


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